Pivilion Quantifications – a research into decentralised [digital] art distribution

It’s been a while. 2018 was quite busy and we’ve been working on other projects. Pivilion is still going strong with continuous support from Akademie Schloss Solitude, where the project was started as part of the Schlosspost Web Residency, and where we currently reside IRL as part of the 2018-2019 Web Based Media fellowship at the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany.

Over the year we’ve made some changes and bugfixes on the Pivilion Gitlab site and are planning to do a major overhaul of the gallery system very soon. Continue reading…

Test run – p!R4T3_P0R//0_//4T3R14L

We’re doing a test run tomorrow (March 18th) morning – from ~07:30 ~ 11:50 (GMT +1) from a bus driving from Osijek to Zagreb.

The 10 pieces in this test run mobile exhibition are by Domenico Barra, a (Dirty) New Media Artist based in Napoli (Italy) working with digital media with a major focus on internet culture. http://patreon.com/dombarra /// http://it.linkedin.com/in/dombarra from his project p!R4T3_P0R//0_//4T3R1L. Continue reading…

Concept framework

Pivilion emerged as an extremely logical collab project at a time of extended telepresence opportunity in a time of scarcity in the cultural sector. (In order to show in a “regular” way, you would need to register, submit and upload your values to the hierarchical nature of the art/net systems and adapt to any existing Terms of Service and the paradigm of classical POV.)

While doing our first net themed collab research (powered by net.cube & G-MK) we articulated a (common) necessity to broaden the limits of our indicated art-void into a factual collaborative non-institutional (self-initiated and ideologically coherent) environment. Continue reading…

A bit of background in plain English

Why would one need a small battery-powered device that can host image galleries from any place in the world with an available WiFi Internet connection?

The idea came to life during Dina’s residency in net.cube at G-MK in Zagreb. She had her own web project (probably down after the event) that required hosting on a local network during a presentation. The Raspberry Pi seemed ideal for the project. We wanted to make the project accessible from the Internet and for that we needed to circumvent closed incoming ports that disallowed us from running services from inside the gallery. Tor hidden services pretty much do that out-of-the box. The rest seemed logical – I powered up one of hacklab01’s RPis and first made it a web server. Then installed Tor and set it up – the whole thing just worked and the setup didn’t take up much time at all.

Continue reading…

Poopative Commons